The Waldrop Firm, P.C.
Call For Your Free, 30-Minute Initial Consultation
901-410-1118

Would bird's nest custody work for your family?

Tennessee parents who are divorcing can run into roadblocks when it comes to the custody of their children. This is typically one of the most contentious issues that divorcing spouses face.

Sometimes settling custody matters requires brainstorming for some original solutions. One of those could wind up being bird's nest parenting.

This custody option involves the children remaining in the home 100 percent of the time while the exes move in and out during their agreed-upon custody times. During times when they don't have their kids, they may live alone in a rented apartment or with friends and relatives. Some divorced spouses even agree to share living space for the times when they don't have the kids.

Why would parents choose bird's nest custody?

Face it — divorce is tough on kids. Allowing them to remain in their same home, sleeping in their familiar bedrooms is least disruptive to their routines. Stability and security are paramount with children, especially during traumatic transitional times like divorce.

There are practical considerations as well. When kids are moving between homes, it's difficult to keep track of each child's school supplies and outfits, sports equipment, ballet shoes and the myriad electronic devices and chargers that even the youngest kids all seem to have. If the kids continue living in the "bird's nest," i.e., the family home, there are fewer chances of leaving anything behind.

It's not for all families

To make this custody plan work, both parents have to commit to a civil and productive relationship in order to provide the best possible living situation for the children they share.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Email Us For A Response

Do You Want To Work With An Experienced
Attorney With A Great Reputation?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy